Saturday, July 22, 2017

Taking the 5th (House, that is!)

 Leo by Ronald Searle
The Sun is about to leave zodiac sign Cancer and begin its transit through the sign of Leo. Leo is associated with astrology's 5th house. 5th house represents, among other things, childhood and child-like activity.

We all, no matter how sophisticated or knowledgeable, retain remnants of childhood/child-like fantasies within our nature. As this summer progresses and nothing at all in current news cycles has much ability to improve a dismal mood, it might be wise to simply "5th-house-it", at least for a short interval, before heading back into the gloom.

Authors of books intended for children often had timeless wise advice to offer, for us all, whatever stage of maturity we have or haven't reached. The following wee snippets always cheer me during times of worry, and wondering about what could possibly come next:

Think (laterally) about A.A. Milne's Winnie the Pooh ~~~

'Supposing a tree fell down, Pooh, when we were underneath it?'
'Supposing it didn't,' said Pooh.
After careful thought Piglet was comforted by this.

It's snowing still," said Eeyore gloomily.
"So it is."
"And freezing."
"Is it?"
"Yes," said Eeyore. "However," he said, brightening up a little, "we haven't had an earthquake lately."

The old gray donkey, Eeyore stood by himself in a thistly corner of the Forest, his front feet well apart, his head on one side, and thought about things. Sometimes he thought sadly to himself, "Why?" and sometimes he thought, "Wherefore?" and sometimes he thought, "Inasmuch as which?" and sometimes he didn't quite know what he was thinking about.

Then think about the Sesame Street story:

There's a Monster at the End of This Book by Jon Stone

Grover is horrified to learn that there is a monster at the end of the book, and begs the reader not to finish the book, so as to avoid the monster.
Fearful of reaching the end of the book, Grover constructs a series of obstacles, such as attempting to tie pages together and laying brick walls, to prevent the reader from advancing. Increasingly frightened (and also in awe of the reader's strength at overcoming the obstacles), Grover pleads with the reader to stop reading as the book nears its conclusion. However, the monster turns out to be Grover himself, making the story self-referential.

OR: the Harry Potter tales~~~

"Happiness can be found even in the darkest times if one only remembers to turn on the light." - Albus Dumbledore.


If You Give a Moose a Muffin, by Laura Joffe Numeroff ~~~

If a big hungry moose comes to visit, you might give him a muffin to make him feel at home. If you give him a muffin, he'll want some jam to go with it. When he's eaten all your muffins, he'll want to go to the store to get some more muffin mix.


But, it's always good to remember that:


anyjazz said...

Just adding one of my favorites. Lewis Carroll — 'Begin at the beginning, the King said, very gravely, and go on till you come to the end: then stop.'

Twilight said...

anyjazz ~ Yes, thanks - that is always a good one to keep in mind! :-)

R J Adams said...

Ah, how I love the pearls of wisdom dancing on these pages from time to time. I'm a particular fan of the one AnyJazz mentions. Mrs RJ will frequently say, while contemplating some domestic chore, "Now, where should I begin today?" To which, my response is always, "My dear, begin at the beginning, go on till you come to the end and then stop." Actually, I don't say it anymore. I'm giving my head chance to stop hurting from being beaten once to often with the sweeping brush.

Twilight said...

RJ Adams ~ Hmmm, yes, now you come to remind me...we do need a new sweeping brush! :-)